US Dept. of Health and Human Services

The mission of the Department of Health and Human Services is to help provide the building blocks that Americans need to live healthy, successful lives.  We fulfill that mission every day by providing millions of children, families, and seniors with access to high-quality health care, by helping people find jobs and parents find affordable child care, by keeping the food on Americans’ shelves safe and infectious diseases at bay, and by pushing the boundaries of how we diagnose and treat disease.

This site provides sources for grant funding, resources related to various health topics, job opportunities, health regulations, and disease prevention strategies.

 

Stop Bullying

Find a community toolkit, training modules, resources and more for understanding and preventing bullying.  Help your community recognize the bullying.

Underage Drinking Program Launched in NC

The North Carolina Alcohol and Beverage Commission is set to launch a new campaign today that focuses on underage drinking in North Carolina. The campaign will target kids as young as eleven.

Click HERE for more on this story

Have You Heard About the Drug Terminator?

The Eden City police department in Rockingham County, NC recently bought a Drug Terminator.  It is an incinerator that instantly burns the drugs instead of them going to a landfill or shipped away for disposal.

County leaders decided to do it on site to save money.  The county first urged people to dispose of prescription drugs through Project Lazarus eight years ago after a high number of deaths and injuries related to prescription drugs.

Click HERE for more on this story

FASD May Affect About 5% of U.S. Children

Although drinking during pregnancy has long been considered taboo, new research suggests that as many as one in 20 U.S. children may have health or behavioral problems related to alcohol exposure before birth.

“Knowing not to drink during pregnancy and not doing so are two different things,” especially before a woman knows she is pregnant, said lead researcher Philip May, a professor of public health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He said the high prevalence of children affected by drinking during pregnancy may be due to social pressures or women’s difficulty in changing their drinking habits.

Findings from the study were reported online Oct. 27 and in the November print issue of Pediatrics.  The researchers found that six to nine of every 1,000 children had fetal alcohol syndrome. And, between 11 and 17 per 1,000 children had partial fetal alcohol syndrome, according to the study.

Click HERE for more on this story.