Children of Military Families at Increased Risk for Substance Use

  In a paper published in the journal Addiction, researchers report that children of military families have a higher risk for alcohol and other substance use than do their peers in nonmilitary families. On the basis of their findings, the researchers suggest that schools and health care providers consider parental military deployment as an opportunity to provide early intervention and screening for substance abuse for young people in military families. The researchers’ data indicated that substance use overall was higher among those in the currently deployed or recently returned groups than in the nonmilitary group. Deployment often means that children…

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Family Physicians Group Offers Doctors Online Tools for Addiction Treatment

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) in cooperation with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is offering its members online tools to help them care for patients and families struggling with addiction.  The tools include the Addiction Performance Project, designed to reduce the stigma often associated with addiction, and to help doctors better identify and assist patients who abuse drugs.

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U.S. High School Students Report Top Reasons for Misusing Prescription Drugs

Nearly one-fourth (24%) of U.S. high school students reported using prescription drugs without a prescription in order to get high or change their mood, according to data from a recently released survey. Of these students, nearly one in five (18%) reported that the main reason they last misused a prescription drug was to help them relax, 16% reported it was to have fun, and 14% reported it was “because being high feels good.” Check out the latest report…

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Kids poisoned by medical marijuana…

Legalizing marijuana may have unintended consequences.  Since medical marijuana was legalized in Colorado, more than a dozen young children have been unintentionally poisoned with the drug, researchers report.   About half the cases resulted from kids eating marijuana-laced cookies, brownies, sodas or candy.  In many cases, the marijuana came from their grandparents’ stash, the investigators said. Continue reading

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Kids Who First Drink During Puberty…

New research shows that youths who first drink during puberty are at greater risk for developing later alcohol problems.  “Most teenagers have their first alcoholic drink during puberty. However, most research on the risks of early-onset alcohol use up to now has not focused on the pubertal stage during which the first alcoholic drink is consumed,” said Miriam Schneider, Ph.D., a researcher at the Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, and one of the authors of the new study. Click here for full story…

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1 in 5 Parents Think What They Say Has Little Impact…

Parents play an important role in preventing substance use among youths.  Because of this, prevention campaigns encourage parents to talk to their children about substance use. However, according to the 2004 to 2011 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, 1 in 5 (22.3 percent) parents of teens aged 12 to 17 thought that what they said would have little influence on whether their child used drugs. Read this report to find our more about parent’s perception and the resource you can provide to help parent talk to their kids about substance abuse

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TBI 12 Step/Education Group

This meeting will provide an opportunity to share ideas and needs related to Brain Injury and Substance Use.  Participants will explore the 12 Step/Substance Use Education and tailor it for individuals with traumatic brain injury.  Individuals with Brain Injuries and Substance Use issues and family members are invited. Where:  Carolinas Rehabilitation, Private Dining Room:  1100 Blythe Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28203 For more information contact Rose Griffin, Project STAR:  704-355-9623

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Parents’ Deployment May Increase Risk of Kids’ Substance Abuse

Researchers from the University of Iowa evaluated data from 2010, when 1.2 million American children had a parent in the active duty military.  Study results suggest parent’s deployment may increase risk of substance abuse in preteen and teens. “We worry a lot about the service men and women and we sometimes forget that they are not the only ones put into harm’s way by deployment—their families are affected, too,” senior study author Stephan Arndt, PhD, said in a news release. “Our findings suggest we need to provide these families with more community support.”  

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